Toro Snowblowers are the best blowers out there as far as I am concerned

Toro Snowblowers

Toro Snowblowers are the best blowers out there as far as I am concerned. What gives me the right to say this? Well I have had my own snow clearing business since 1992. I look after residential customers that don’t want to or can’t clear their own snow.

I started out with less than 10 customers and have now grown the amount of driveways to 75 that are done each time there is a snowfall. I personally do 30-35 of them myself. Multiply that number (30) by an average of 25 snowfalls a season and you would get more than 7,500 driveways over just the last 10 years alone.

Yes I live in Canada (the great White North) but I’m not way up in the Arctic, I'm right on Lake Ontario in the Town of Cobourg. We receive much of the same weather patterns as the states of Michigan, New York and Vermont.

I’ve used and worn out more than one brand name of snowblower since then. I started using a new 7 hp. 24” (cut or clearing width) Noma. This blower was suitable for my first couple of winters. It had a good motor size to clearing width ratio.

Unfortunately it had small sized tires which made more difficult to use in heavier or wet snowfalls. It wasn’t a very heavy blower and it would not always clear snow down to the pavement on the first pass over an area of a driveway.

The design of the auger intake chute wasn't very good and it would not throw wet snow more than a couple of feet at a time which in turn caused it to take a lot more time and effort to clear a driveway. (not good when you get paid by the driveway, instead of by the hour)

Thinking I needed to go big after using such a small blower I next bought a very old used Cub Cadet 10-1/2hp 33”. This snowblower was a tank. It was extremely hard to manoeuvre and change direction with. It still used a poor design when it came to its auger intake and directional chute. (at the time I didn't know any better)

It could have been any brand name from back then; I got it from a friend of a friend (like so many of us do) so I had no idea of how well it had been maintained. At the time I had more problems keeping it running due to carburetor problems. That’s the chance you take buying used snowblowers.

I had only paid $300 for it and sold to my father in law for $100, he had a mechanical friend put a carburetor kit on it and continued to use it for a few years on his own driveway.

So from small to very big I had learned some lessons on what works well (and what doesn’t work so well), so next to a type of snowblower that’s in between my first 2 machines.

The choice was made was to buy new from now on. An 8-1/2hp 26” MTD was purchased. This was the first machine I had purchased that had an improved tapered design when it came to the auger directional chute.

By tapering the directional chute the snow flows slightly better up and out of the chute from the auger housing. It helps to throw the snow further as well as more accuracy when placing the snow in a certain area is important.

The hp to clearing width ratio with this blower worked well it was the largest engine I could get at the time with that width. This meant that the MTD had enough power to throw the snow during most snowfall situations (except for deep amounts of wet snow) at a reasonable speed.

This machine was much easier to manoeuvre and had a reasonable weight to it when clearing deeper snow. I continued using this blower for a couple of seasons. As this machines started to wear it began loosing hp. When this happens the blower won’t be able to blow snow as far as it used to, which reduces the speed in takes to clear the driveway, increasing the time needed to do the job.

The main problems that were encountered with my MTD were the number of times adjustment to the cables would need to be made (mostly to the drive cable). The more the cable was tightened the sooner it broke. These types of cables are the ones that are attached at the handle with a “z” end threaded screw. The other end of the cable has just a small hooked spring that doesn’t offer much travel when put under load.

This MTD snowblower was prone to auger belt wear (even though their design featured twin belts to drive snow out of the auger intake and chute), once the belt starts to wear the cable need to be adjusted thus the back and forth corrections begin.

It may take a season for the average home owner (depending on the frequency and amount of snow that falls in their area) to see these problems begin they do happen with greater frequency than Toro Snowblowers.

After buying an MTD 8-1/2hp 26” I deduced that I needed more power (as hp reduces with use) so the next year a White 10hp 28” (White is actually just another name for MTD). Ah, finally a the best engine to clearing width ratio, weight, relative ease of directing this blower and lots of power but still those cable/belt problems persisted.

Toro Snowblowers offer one of the best products in the industry

So from small to very big I had learned some lessons on what works well (and what doesn't work so well), so next to a type of snowblower that’s in between my first 2 machines.

The choice was made was to buy new from now on. An 8-1/2hp 26” MTD was purchased. This was the first machine I had purchased that had an improved tapered design when it came to the auger directional chute.

By tapering the directional chute the snow flows slightly better up and out of the chute from the auger housing. It helps to throw the snow further as well as more accuracy when placing the snow in a certain area is important.

The hp to clearing width ratio with this blower worked well it was the largest engine I could get at the time with that width. This meant that the MTD had enough power to throw the snow during most snowfall situations (except for deep amounts of wet snow) at a reasonable speed.

This machine was much easier to manoeuvre and had a reasonable weight to it when clearing deeper snow. I continued using this blower for a couple of seasons. As this machines started to wear it began loosing hp. When this happens the blower won’t be able to blow snow as far as it used to, which reduces the speed in takes to clear the driveway, increasing the time needed to do the job.

The main problems that were encountered with my MTD were the number of times adjustment to the cables would need to be made (mostly to the drive cable). The more the cable was tightened the sooner it broke. These types of cables are the ones that are attached at the handle with a “z” end threaded screw. The other end of the cable has just a small hooked spring that doesn't offer much travel when put under load.

This MTD snowblower was prone to auger belt wear (even though their design featured twin belts to drive snow out of the auger intake and chute), once the belt starts to wear the cable need to be adjusted thus the back and forth corrections begin.

It may take a season for the average home owner (depending on the frequency and amount of snow that falls in their area) to see these problems begin they do happen with greater frequency than Toro Snowblowers.

After buying an MTD 8-1/2hp 26” I deduced that I needed more power (as hp reduces with use) so the next year a White 10hp 28” (White is actually just another name for MTD). Ah, finally a the best engine of directing this blower and lots of power but still those cable/belt problems persisted.

So we’ll take all that we have learned so far and find that if there’s that one blower that solves all those problems we’ve been discussing so far.

Along comes Toro Snowblowers, they cost a couple of hundred dollars more but they will last the home owner lifetime. Toro has solved all the problems with their 10hp 28” PowerMax XLE.

This snowblower lives up to its name. It has the power to blow snow, a little or a lot, fluffy powder or a wet sloppy mess (no one else’s blower to date can fire the wet slop).

It has a strong 10hp Briggs and Stratton engine, an innovative shaped enlarged auger intake that can draw in more cubic inches of snow than its competitors (thereby throwing more snow at a faster rate).

It is a much better designed machine. Toro Snowblowers have strengthened their machines by adding 2 pieces of metal at key stress points, at the snow intake housing and the rest of the blower (transmission/engine mount/axle housing).

Toro Snowblowers also have a tapered snow directional chute which adds to the unique enlarged auger intake giving the PowerMax a distinct advantage over other manufacturers as this blower will throw the heavy wet slop that all the others can’t.

These machines don’t go trough belts and cables like the other before it. The types of cables used by Toro Snowblowers are of a better design as well. The cable is shorter and has larger heavy duty spring that offers a lot more tension to be applied without risk of the cable snapping. On the other machines the cables are much longer, travel over small rollers that change the direction of the cable and have small springs that provide little stretch and more tension adjustments.

and now cables for Toro Snowblowers ...

Over the past 3 winters I’ve been using my Toro 10 hp 28” Powermax LXE over 1750 driveways have been cleared. In that same time the only items that need broke and had to be repaired was 1 drive cable, 1 set of belts that were looking worn, late last year as I can’t afford to wait until they break (they always break when you need them the most out blowing snow).

Then just a week ago after being out 9 more times (30 customers) this December the rubber friction wheel had to be replaced as the machine would slide in and out of the speed that had been selected. The cause was a glazed and worn friction wheel.

Keep in mind how long is it going to take you the average home owner to clear your driveway 1500 times? I don’t know, but I’m betting that for most a Toro 10hp 28” PowerMax LXE will be the only blower you’ll ever need.

I hope this helps with Toro Snowblowers.

"Keep It Simple to Succeed" Keep Your Driveways and side walks Snow Free

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